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Today is February 1, 2013. For the city I live in this a day of remembering. History was made here on February 1, 1960 when four young African American men took seats at the lunch counter at the local F.W.Woolworth Co. store downtown asking to be served. This was not the first sit-in however. This idea can be traced back to a library in Alexandria, Virginia in 1938. Then another took place in Chicago in 1942. Several more took place over the next 18 years until finally, in 1960, four young freshmen from North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University (then know as a college) decided it was time for them to take a stand for equal rights.

The GReensboro 4
The first day was peaceful, quiet and rather inconsequential but they came back day after day and the numbers increased from the original four to 500 just five days later. The following week students in Charlotte staged sit-ins at eight different stores around that town. The “sit-in movement” was come to life and the world was beginning to take notice. It was time to change the way we did things.
We still have a long way to go before every man, woman and child is thought of as equal to everyone else on the planet. I believe we are getting help with this change from the source of all that is, the master artist, the creator of everything and with assistance of all the benevolent beings of the universe.

I hope to share more insights on the topic of change in future posts but for now I really want to focus on today, the 53rd anniversary of the Greensboro sit-ins. That day in 1960, four young men stood up or sat down for change. Joseph McNeil, Franklin McCain, Ezell Blair, Jr. (later known as Jibreel Khazan), and David Richmond, took a seat at the lunch counter of a five and dime store called F.W.Woolworth Co. They peacefully asked for change. We’ve come a long way .Change is in the air. I hope you embrace its goodness and bend with its awkwardness and the parts that make you feel uncomfortable. By doing so, you will be transformed into a better person I promise. Don’t be afraid. It is all good!

If you are ever in the Greensboro, North Carolina area, I hope you make time to visit the wonderful museum dedicated to the Civil rights movement and the Greensboro sit-in. I friend took me there just over a week ago. My visit was long over due and it was truly a profound experience.  You can check out the museums web page here: http://www.sitinmovement.org/

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